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Princely State of Loharu
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Loharu - A 9 Gun Salute State


Loharu lies at 280 26' north latitude and 750 49' east longitude, about 60 kilometres to the south-west of Bhiwani on the Bhiwani-Jaipur road. It is the headquarters of the tahsil of its name. It is a railway station on the Rewari-Rajgarh section of northern railway and a Junction for Jaipur. It is an isolated town in the vicinity of the Rajasthan border. The houses in the town are scattered. These are generally built of stone and lime in the old style. Houses made of brick, cement and steel with modern design are also coming up. The streets are mostly pakka. Legend has it that the site of the town was originally inhabited by Lohars (blacksmiths), from whom the town derived its name. The town used to be the seat of the Nawab of Loharu till 1950 when it was merged with the Hisar district, and included in the Bhiwani district on its formation in December, 1972. Of the ancient history of Loharu, little is known. It once formed part of Jaipur State, but towards the middle of the 18th century some adventurous Thakurs, after the fashion of the day, shook off the Jaipur authority and formed an independent State. The Raja of Khetri, Bhopal Singh, a satellite of the Jaipur raj, attempted to subdue them but was slain in battle at Loharu. The place was, however, reannexed to Jaipur for a time, but it soon regained independence. Subsequently it acknowledged British suzerainty, and the government ceded it to the Maharaja of Alwar, who had loyally aided them during the Maratha Campaign. Nawab Ahmed Bakhsh Khan, who served the Maharaja of Alwar, was given this area in recognition of his services. Thus he was the virtual founder of the family which ruled over the area for seven generations.

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(A PORTRAIT OF NAWAB AHMAD BAKSH KHAN OF LoharuDelhi, circa 1810)
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(A PORTRAIT OF Sir Amiruddin Ahmad Khan Nawab of Loharu,1884-1920)

Sams-ud-din Khan, the eldest son of Ahmad Baksh Khan, succeeded him in the year 1827, but his rule did not last long. Sams-ud-din was executed by the British administration in the year 1835 for his involvement in the conspiracy to murder Sir William Frazer, the Resident of British India to Delhi. Eventually the British Government of India took away the pargana of Firozepur (Ferozepur) and the administration of the princely state of Loharu was handed over to his brothers Zia-ud-din and Amin Ud-din Ahmad Khan. After the great revolt of 1857, both of them were kept under supervision for a while and were later released. Their positions ware also restored later. Mahal Sara was the haveli or mansion of the Nawab of Loharu which is situated in Gali Qasim Jan, Ballimaran. Renowned poet Mirza Ghalib, his son-in-law, resided in the haveli for a number of years.

Amin ud-din Khan, was succeeded by his son Alauddin Ahmed Khan in the year 1869 and was given the title of Nawab. Amir ud-din Ahmad Khan, son of Alauddin Ahmed Khan, succeed him in 1884 after governing the state on behalf of his father. He served as an administrator and adviser of the state of Malerkotla from 1893 to 1903. During this period, the princely state of Loharu was managed by Bashiruddin Ahmed Khan his younger brother. Amir ud-din Ahmad Khan was honoured with the Knight Commander of the Order of the Star of India (KCSI) by the British Government of India in the year 1903. He was also granted a 9 gun personal salute from 1st January 1903. Later he was appointed as a member of the legislative council of the Viceroy of India. He abdicated Aizzuddin Ahmad Khan, his second son, in the year 1920. He died in 1926 and left the administration of the princely state to his son Amin ud-din Ahmad Khan, who became the last Nawab of the princely state of Loharu. But as the new ruler was still a minor at the time, Amir ud-din Ahmad Khan governed the state until Amin ud-din reached the age of majority in the year 1931.

"The Royal family of Loharu traces its lineage to Khwaja Ahmed Yasavi, a Sufi scholar and poet widely revered the world over for spreading Sufism"


After the withdrawal of the British administration and independence of India on 15th August 1947, the Princely State of Loharu was acceded to the newly formed Dominion of India, also called the Union of India. Most of the members of the ruling family and the muslim populace of the region settled in Lahore that was located in Pakistan. However, the Nawab of the erstwhile Loharu and his direct descendants stayed in India. After the Indian Independence, the former Nawab of the princely state of Loharu, Amin ud-din Ahmad Khan, served in the Indian Army and participated in the Liberation of Goa in 1961. Later he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Rajasthan state and became the Governor of Himachal Pradesh in 1977 and the Governor of Punjab in the year 1981.

Succession of Loharu Nawabs

  1. Ahmed Baksh Khan : 1806-1827
  2. Amsuddin Khan : 1827-1835
  3. Aminuddin Khan : 1835-1869
  4. Alauddin Ahmed Khan : 1869-1884
  5. Amiruddin Ahmed Khan : 1884-1920
  6. Ajazuddin Ahmed Khan : 1920-1926
  7. Aminuddin Ahmed Khan : 1926-1947

History of Loharu Royal Family


The Royal family of Loharu traces its lineage to Khwaja Ahmed Yasavi, a Sufi scholar and poet widely revered the world over for spreading Sufism. The Mausoleum of Khwaja Ahmed Yasavi, commissioned in the year 1389 by Timur, marked the beginning of Timurid style of architecture. The Mausoleum located in the modern-day town of Turkestan is a World Heritage Site and is amongst the most famous monuments of the 12th century in Central Asia. In the mid-18th century, three brothers from the family of Khwaja Ahmed Yasavi – Qasim Jan, Arif Jan and Alam Jan migrated from Bukhara in Uzbekistan to India and soon rose to be amongst the principle nobles in the Royal Court of Delhi.

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Genocology of Loharu Dynasty.

Lost Airport of Loharu's Nawab


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Just 28 years after the wright brothers first flight in plane princely state ‘Loharu’ witnessed its first flight. On 21st September 1931 an Aircraft of Delhi Flying Club touched the land of Loharu. Loharu Aerordrome was built in 1931 by Last Nawab of Loharu Aminuddin Ahmad Khan near Fartia Tal Village just 3 km from Loharu city. Though the first plane touched down Loharu was in 1931. British government also declared Loharu Aerodrome as an Emergency Landing strip for the Royal British Air force posted in New Delhi. So, very often Royal Airforce’s plane land there at the time of weather disturbance in New Delhi.

Loharu Aerodrome had Tiger Moth Aircraft at that time. People also said ‘once a big Aircraft of Royal Airforce came to Loharu Aerodrome and due to technical errors that stayed here many days, and people came to see that from villages. In those days seeing a aircraft was a big thing. First Aircraft touched down Loharu Aerodrome was on 21st September 1931. Before this there was an announcement in the local villages that some Instrument which flies will come to Loharu, so many people gathered there to see it. And local call it ‘Cheel- Gadi’. There was some kind of tradition in Loharu that each year on the first day of January there happens to be a ‘Joy Ride’ on Aerodrome in which any person can ride the Aircraft with Pilot after paying some kind of fees, many people of that time enjoyed it.

Former Home Minister who was called ‘Iron Man of India’-Vallabh Bhai Patel had also come to Loharu by this Aerodrome at the time of Loharu state Merger with India. Chief Pilot Instructor of ‘Delhi Flying Club’ also came to Loharu Many times. Former chief minister of Odisha ‘Biju Patnaik’ also came to Loharu Aerodrome in his flying days. This Aerodrome was the first Aerodrome of Haryana (Eastern Punjab of British India). This Aerodrome was most probably 5th or 6th oldest flying Station of India. This Aerodrome was in use till the 60’s. Today, this Aerodrome is in complete ruin. The aerodrome is buried under the farm lands but its ruins are still present to describe its history.

Loharu got independence in 1948


India may have got independence on 15 August 1947 on the basis of many struggles and sacrifices, but the people of Loharu region had to struggle for about 6 months more to get real princely independence. It is also true that the people of the erstwhile Loharu princely state got real independence on 23 February 1948 after all the struggle and agitation. It is noteworthy that at the time of independence of the country in 1947, the then Nawab of Loharu state had merged this princely state with Bikaner princely state, while the people here wanted to join East Punjab. Former MLA Mr. It is mentioned in Chandrabhan Obra's book titled Loharu Bavani Ka Itihasa that the princely state of Loharu, from its inception in 1803 to February 23, 1948, was allegedly plagued by atrocities from the Nawabi regime and the people here always strongly opposed the oppression. According to the book there was great anger among the people due to the various taxes imposed by the Nawab. The struggle of Badda Jat, a brave farmer of Mandholi Kalan village after the severe famine of 1877, also faded after the Nawab ordered him to be hanged. The sacrifice of Badda Jat paid off and the people of the princely state began to ignite the flames of rebellion. On August 6, 1935, Chauhadkalan was united in the village, but with the connivance of the Nawab, the English army raided and arrested more than 50 people and imprisoned them. Two days after this incident, on August 8, thousands of angry people gathered in Singhani village of the princely state. People who were meeting peacefully were fired with bullets, in which more than three dozen people became the waste of time. According to the book, on April 1, 1940, with the efforts of Swami Swatanand, the foundation of Arya Samaj was laid in Loharu and the people who joined Arya Samaj started uniting for freedom from the Nawabi rule. On 29 March 1941, when Swami Swatanand and hundreds of Arya Samajists were performing Nagar Kirtan in the first anniversary of Arya Samaj, the Nawab's army attacked them. In which many people including Swamiji were injured. The movement gained a lot of momentum with the formation of Praja Mandal on 20 September 1946.

On the basis of the sacrifices of many patriots, the country got independence on 15 August 1947 and the government was formed at the center under the leadership of Jawaharlal Nehru, yet the princely state of Loharu was fighting for independence from the Nawabi rule. By passing a resolution in the open session of Prajamandal held in Khorad village of Jind district, it was told to the Maharaja of Bikaner that the Nawab of Bikaner has merged the Loharu state without taking the opinion of the people and they will meet in your state on any condition. don't want Therefore, respecting the wishes of the subjects, you should hand over the administration of Loharu state to the Government of India. If you do not pay any attention to this proposal, then we will be forced to fight for independence by forming a provisional government. The first MLA of Loharu, Bhakta Bujaram, former MLA Chandrabhan Obra, along with the representatives of Praja Mandal met the President of Riyasati Praja Mandal, Dr. Pattabhi Sitaramayya in Delhi and apprised them of the wishes of the people. The Nawab presented his side before him. After being aware of the whole situation, Dr. Sitaramayya informed the Prajamandal representatives to the Chief Minister of Saurashtra, U.N. Sent to Debar. Debar told that in view of the legal situation arising after the merger with the princely state of Bikaner, you should go to the villages of your princely state and get people's signatures in favor of its merger with Punjab. By getting all the villages to sign the affidavit, the people of Loharu, who were passionate about independence, on the advice of Debar, obtained written no-objection from the Chief Minister of Rajasthan Mohanlal Sukhadia and Akali leader Tara Singh that they had no objection to the merger of Loharu with Punjab. After this, the MP Lala Achitram himself went to Singhani's public meeting and asked the opinion of the public. All in one voice spoke of merger with Punjab. Ultimately, the efforts of the people of Loharu, Prajamandal and Arya Samaj paid off and Loharu became a part of the then princely state of Punjab on 23 February 1948.

Mirza Ghalib's relation with Loharu State


Of course, the great Adeeb and poet Mirza Ghalib may not be with us today, but his presence continues to knock every now and then. Whenever Urdu-Persian poetry is mentioned in the Indian subcontinent, it is natural that Ghalib is also mentioned in that gathering by law. The style of poetry that Ghalib had, is nowhere to be found.

Born in Agra in 1797, Mirza Asad-Ullah Baig Khan alias "Ghalib" said goodbye to this world forever on 15 February 1869 in Delhi. Mirza was also the court poet of Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last ruler of the Mughal period. Few people know that Ghalib, who spent most of his life in Agra, Delhi and Calcutta, was also related to Haryana. Shams Tabrezi, head of Haryana Urdu Academy, tells that Mirza Ghalib's in-laws were in Firozpur Jhirka. Mirza Ghalib was the brother-in-law of Nawab Samshudin of the princely state of Firozpur Jhirka in Haryana.

Experts say that Mirza Ghalib was married to Umrao Begum, the daughter of Nawab Ahmed Bakhsh's first wife. The funny thing is that after the death of Ghalib, when his wife Umrao Mirza died, at that time Begum Umrao's pension was available only from the princely state of Firozpur Jhirka. However, later the British stopped his pension.

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360 Virtual Tour



Panoromic 360 Aerial view of Loharu Fort.